The Art of Engagement

The Art of Engagement

The Art of Engagement


Learning is not a spectator sport. Students do not learn much just by sitting in class listening to teachers, memorizing prepackaged assignments, and spitting out answers. They must talk about what they are learning, write about it, relate it to past experiences, apply it to their daily lives. They must make what they learn part of themselves.
Arthur W. Chickering and Zelda F. Gamson


Active learning, put simply is not passive, preferably not didactic, not mere note taking etc. Ideally it provides a shift from the teacher or facilitator ‘doing’ to the student ‘doing’. This may take any number of forms; motor or physically active, sensory / perceptually active or activated, verbal actions, cognitive activity, collaborative or co-operative engagement / activity etc

Cone of Learning

How do we engage students in the teaching and learning process? The ‘Cone of Learning’ supports the assumption that as one actively engages in the process of learning, it has a direct impact on the participants’ ability to not only recall, but to be able to apply and evaluate the context within which the materials are presented. As a direct consequence the student may be able to relate and adapt what they have learned to subsequent ‘real world’ events, demonstrating their ability to analyze and synthesize information and propose alternative solutions.


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